Curtis Powell assists the firm in biotechnology patent prosecution and has extensive knowledge in the areas of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology and genetics. He has assisted with application drafting, patent prosecution and freedom-to-operate searches.

Prior to joining Wolf Greenfield, Curtis received his PhD in Biological Chemistry at the University of Michigan. Following his PhD, Curtis was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute at the University of Michigan. Curtis’ research focused on the role that DNA methylation and Apobec2 proteins play during zebrafish retina and optic nerve regeneration, opening new avenues for research in stimulating mammalian regeneration.

While a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Curtis participated as a Graduate Student Instructor in a course designed to teach undergraduate students various biochemical topics including protein folding and structure, nucleic acid structure/chemistry, DNA replication, transcription, translation, signal transduction, epigenetics and immunology.

  • During law school, Curtis participated in the Emmett Environmental Law and Policy Clinic. While participating in the clinic, Curtis helped develop a manual to support people who are researching and responding to public health and environmental concerns. See Powell C., Godfrey P., Jacobs W., Goho S., and Joroff A. (2017) A Manual for Citizen Scientists Starting or Participating in Data Collection and Environmental Monitoring Projects, Harvard Law School Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic. 
  • Between 2009 and 2015, Curtis participated as a volunteer in the Boy Scouts of America in various capacities including Den Leader, Assistant Scoutmaster and Scoutmaster.
  • 2015 Biological Chemistry Dziewiatkoski Award, University of Michigan - Most Outstanding Dissertation
  • 2014 Proquest Distinguished Dissertation Award Nominee, University of Michigan
  • 2014 Biological Chemistry Lee Murphy Memorial Prize, University of Michigan - Most Significant Scientific Paper
  • 2013 Rackham Graduate School Predoctoral Fellowship, University of Michigan - Top 3% at Rackham Graduate School
  • 2011 Biological Chemistry Halvor N. and Mary Christensen Award - Most Outstanding 2nd year Graduate Student

Articles

November 25, 2016

Seeking Clarity as the Dust from the Akamai v. Limelight Litigation Settles



Scientific Publications

  • Powell C., Cornblath E., Elsaidi F., Wan J., and Goldman D. (2016) Zebrafish Muller glia-derived progenitors are multipotent, exhibit proliferative biases and regenerate excess neurons. Sci. Rep. 6:24851. 
  • Powell C., Cornblath E., and Goldman D. (2014) Zinc-Binding Domain-Dependent, Deaminase-Independent Actions of Apolipoprotein B mRNA Editing Enzyme, Catalytic Polypeptide 2 (Apobec2) Mediate Its Effect on Zebrafish Retina Regeneration. J Biol Chem 289, 28924-28941. 
  • Powell C., Sowden J.C., and Beebe D.C. (2014) Chapter 4 - Restoring Vision to the Blind: Stem Cells and Transplantation. Trans. Vis. Sci. Tech. 3, 7. 
  • Powell C., Goldman D., and Hyde D.R. (2014) Chapter 5 – Restoring Vision to the Blind: Endogenous Regeneration. Trans. Vis. Sci. Tech. 3, 7.
  • Zhao X.F., Wan J., Powell C., Ramachandran R., Myers M.G., Goldman D. (2014) Leptin and IL-6 Family Cytokines Synergize to Stimulate Muller Glia Reprogramming and Retina Regeneration. Cell Reports 9, 272-284.
  • Powell C., Grant A. R., Cornblath E., and Goldman D. (2013) Analysis of DNA methylation reveals a partial reprogramming of the Muller glia genome during retina regeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110, 19814-19819.
  • Powell C., Elsaeidi F., and Goldman D. (2012) Injury-dependent Muller glia and ganglion cell reprogramming during tissue regeneration requires Apobec2a and Apobec2b. J Neurosci 32, 1096-1109.



  • Curtis is an Eagle Scout, an outdoorsman and a carpenter.
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Curtis Powell assists the firm in biotechnology patent prosecution and has extensive knowledge in the areas of biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology and genetics. He has assisted with application drafting, patent prosecution and freedom-to-operate searches.

Prior to joining Wolf Greenfield, Curtis received his PhD in Biological Chemistry at the University of Michigan. Following his PhD, Curtis was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute at the University of Michigan. Curtis’ research focused on the role that DNA methylation and Apobec2 proteins play during zebrafish retina and optic nerve regeneration, opening new avenues for research in stimulating mammalian regeneration.

While a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Curtis participated as a Graduate Student Instructor in a course designed to teach undergraduate students various biochemical topics including protein folding and structure, nucleic acid structure/chemistry, DNA replication, transcription, translation, signal transduction, epigenetics and immunology.

  • During law school, Curtis participated in the Emmett Environmental Law and Policy Clinic. While participating in the clinic, Curtis helped develop a manual to support people who are researching and responding to public health and environmental concerns. See Powell C., Godfrey P., Jacobs W., Goho S., and Joroff A. (2017) A Manual for Citizen Scientists Starting or Participating in Data Collection and Environmental Monitoring Projects, Harvard Law School Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic. 
  • Between 2009 and 2015, Curtis participated as a volunteer in the Boy Scouts of America in various capacities including Den Leader, Assistant Scoutmaster and Scoutmaster.
  • 2015 Biological Chemistry Dziewiatkoski Award, University of Michigan - Most Outstanding Dissertation
  • 2014 Proquest Distinguished Dissertation Award Nominee, University of Michigan
  • 2014 Biological Chemistry Lee Murphy Memorial Prize, University of Michigan - Most Significant Scientific Paper
  • 2013 Rackham Graduate School Predoctoral Fellowship, University of Michigan - Top 3% at Rackham Graduate School
  • 2011 Biological Chemistry Halvor N. and Mary Christensen Award - Most Outstanding 2nd year Graduate Student

Scientific Publications

  • Powell C., Cornblath E., Elsaidi F., Wan J., and Goldman D. (2016) Zebrafish Muller glia-derived progenitors are multipotent, exhibit proliferative biases and regenerate excess neurons. Sci. Rep. 6:24851. 
  • Powell C., Cornblath E., and Goldman D. (2014) Zinc-Binding Domain-Dependent, Deaminase-Independent Actions of Apolipoprotein B mRNA Editing Enzyme, Catalytic Polypeptide 2 (Apobec2) Mediate Its Effect on Zebrafish Retina Regeneration. J Biol Chem 289, 28924-28941. 
  • Powell C., Sowden J.C., and Beebe D.C. (2014) Chapter 4 - Restoring Vision to the Blind: Stem Cells and Transplantation. Trans. Vis. Sci. Tech. 3, 7. 
  • Powell C., Goldman D., and Hyde D.R. (2014) Chapter 5 – Restoring Vision to the Blind: Endogenous Regeneration. Trans. Vis. Sci. Tech. 3, 7.
  • Zhao X.F., Wan J., Powell C., Ramachandran R., Myers M.G., Goldman D. (2014) Leptin and IL-6 Family Cytokines Synergize to Stimulate Muller Glia Reprogramming and Retina Regeneration. Cell Reports 9, 272-284.
  • Powell C., Grant A. R., Cornblath E., and Goldman D. (2013) Analysis of DNA methylation reveals a partial reprogramming of the Muller glia genome during retina regeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110, 19814-19819.
  • Powell C., Elsaeidi F., and Goldman D. (2012) Injury-dependent Muller glia and ganglion cell reprogramming during tissue regeneration requires Apobec2a and Apobec2b. J Neurosci 32, 1096-1109.


Articles

November 25, 2016

Seeking Clarity as the Dust from the Akamai v. Limelight Litigation Settles



  • Curtis is an Eagle Scout, an outdoorsman and a carpenter.