Emily Gardel focuses her practice on patent prosecution in areas where electronic devices and software overlap with biotechnology. She has worked with technologies related to single molecule detection, imaging systems, medical devices, microfluidics, biosensors, diagnostic devices and software, bioinformatics, and data processing, including technologies implementing machine learning.

Emily works with start-ups, midsize firms, and large multi-national companies, as well as several academic institutions. She has extensive experience handling prosecution matters in the biological-electrical-computational space, advising clients on all aspects of IP strategy and portfolio development both in the United States and abroad. Emily also advises clients on related issues beyond patent prosecution, including due diligence and freedom-to-operate.

Emily’s graduate research on microbial extracellular electron transfer at Harvard involved designing bioelectrochemical systems, culturing microorganisms, using optical and electron microscopy in combination with sample preparation and image analysis techniques, analyzing genomic sequence data. Emily has also performed research on force generation in two- and three-dimensional granular flow materials and methods to remove aberrations from optical traps.

  • Drafted and prosecuted patent applications related to optical and electronic bioassay devices, including DNA sequencing devices, bioinformatics, medical devices, medical imaging, microfluidics, image processing, and semiconductor devices
  • Prosecuted patent applications in the United States and abroad in a wide range of areas, including DNA sequencing devices, sequencing analysis software, medical devices, and light-emitting transistors
  • Assisted in developing and managing patent portfolios for multiple start-ups and mid-size companies
  • Conducted prior art searches and patentability studies, including for clients working with bioinformatics, machine learning techniques for processing biological data, and semiconductor devices
  • Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Research Fellowship
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship
  • Harold T. White Prize for Excellence in Teaching, Harvard Physics Department
  • Jurisprudence Award in Professional Responsibility, Suffolk University Law School

Articles

August 1, 2019

Strategies For Patenting AI Innovations In Life Sciences

Blogs

May 31, 2017

Proper Obviousness Rejection Requires a Rationale for Combining Prior Art References



Scientific Publications
  • A. Bose, E. J. Gardel, C. Vidoudez, E. A. Parra, P. R. Girguis Microbial Photoelectroautotrophy by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1, in submission at Nature Communications
  • E. J. Gardel, M. Nielsen., P. Grisdela Jr., P. R. Girguis Duty Cycling Influences Current Generation in Multi-Anode Environmental Microbial Fuel Cells, Environmental Science & Technology, 46 5222-5229 (2012)
  • E. Gardel, E. Seitaridou, K. Facto, N. Easwar, N. Menon, Dynamical Fluctuations in Dense Granular Flows, Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 367, 5109-5121 (2009)
  • Y. Roichman, A. Waldron, E. Gardel, D. Grier D. Performance of Optical Traps with Geometric Aberrations, Applied Optics, 45 3425-3429 (2006)


Emily is interested in increasing diversity in tech and among inventors, and participates in mentoring programs and events through organizations that focus on improving representation of minority groups in STEM fields.

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Emily Gardel focuses her practice on patent prosecution in areas where electronic devices and software overlap with biotechnology. She has worked with technologies related to single molecule detection, imaging systems, medical devices, microfluidics, biosensors, diagnostic devices and software, bioinformatics, and data processing, including technologies implementing machine learning.

Emily works with start-ups, midsize firms, and large multi-national companies, as well as several academic institutions. She has extensive experience handling prosecution matters in the biological-electrical-computational space, advising clients on all aspects of IP strategy and portfolio development both in the United States and abroad. Emily also advises clients on related issues beyond patent prosecution, including due diligence and freedom-to-operate.

Emily’s graduate research on microbial extracellular electron transfer at Harvard involved designing bioelectrochemical systems, culturing microorganisms, using optical and electron microscopy in combination with sample preparation and image analysis techniques, analyzing genomic sequence data. Emily has also performed research on force generation in two- and three-dimensional granular flow materials and methods to remove aberrations from optical traps.

  • Drafted and prosecuted patent applications related to optical and electronic bioassay devices, including DNA sequencing devices, bioinformatics, medical devices, medical imaging, microfluidics, image processing, and semiconductor devices
  • Prosecuted patent applications in the United States and abroad in a wide range of areas, including DNA sequencing devices, sequencing analysis software, medical devices, and light-emitting transistors
  • Assisted in developing and managing patent portfolios for multiple start-ups and mid-size companies
  • Conducted prior art searches and patentability studies, including for clients working with bioinformatics, machine learning techniques for processing biological data, and semiconductor devices
  • Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Research Fellowship
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship
  • Harold T. White Prize for Excellence in Teaching, Harvard Physics Department
  • Jurisprudence Award in Professional Responsibility, Suffolk University Law School
Scientific Publications
  • A. Bose, E. J. Gardel, C. Vidoudez, E. A. Parra, P. R. Girguis Microbial Photoelectroautotrophy by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1, in submission at Nature Communications
  • E. J. Gardel, M. Nielsen., P. Grisdela Jr., P. R. Girguis Duty Cycling Influences Current Generation in Multi-Anode Environmental Microbial Fuel Cells, Environmental Science & Technology, 46 5222-5229 (2012)
  • E. Gardel, E. Seitaridou, K. Facto, N. Easwar, N. Menon, Dynamical Fluctuations in Dense Granular Flows, Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 367, 5109-5121 (2009)
  • Y. Roichman, A. Waldron, E. Gardel, D. Grier D. Performance of Optical Traps with Geometric Aberrations, Applied Optics, 45 3425-3429 (2006)

Articles

August 1, 2019

Strategies For Patenting AI Innovations In Life Sciences

Blogs

May 31, 2017

Proper Obviousness Rejection Requires a Rationale for Combining Prior Art References


Emily is interested in increasing diversity in tech and among inventors, and participates in mentoring programs and events through organizations that focus on improving representation of minority groups in STEM fields.